Nutrition: Eating for Weight Loss vs Eating for Energy

Many of us at some   point or another have gone on a “diet”: a regimen for how,   what and when to eat.  The term “diet” seems to have   acquired a negative connotation…one that immediately is associated with limitation   and restriction.When we   approach eating and the food choices we make based on a need to   “loose” or “eliminate” extra pounds, rather than from a   perspective of how to best nurture, support and fuel our bodies, we are   initiating action and choices from a negative place of restriction and   unpleasant control.  Desperate to get into and out of this   uncomfortable restriction as quickly as possible, we choose to   follow a pre-defined and easily understood “one size fits all”   formula (diet) that may have worked for someone else, in the hopes to find   the weight loss results we are looking for as quickly as possible. These   diets will generally either impose boundaries on our choices based on   calorie counts and portion sizing, or impose exclusions of  specific macronutrients (protein or   carbohydrate). Sometimes the prescribed diet will include both.The fundamental   issue with this approach is that as long as the ultimate goal   is weight loss/taking pounds off, then we do not perceive weight as a   reflection of our overall state of health.If, on the other   hand, we look at weight (whether we are over-weight or under-weight),   and weight distribution throughout our bodies (where we hold our weight), as   an indicator of our state of health, we can then approach diet from the   perspective of health management and support of our body’s needs.    Coming at this from a more positive place and in support of our energy,   clarity and vitality will automatically be less restrictive and   yield better and longer lasting results.I know….you’re   probably wondering: how on earth can any effort toward weight   loss be anything less than restrictive? Well, it can and should   be.  This is because our bodies have needs and   we must support those needs generously. We need to give our   bodies plenty of what they need in order to gain and   sustain the health and energy required to get rid of   what they don’t need. 

Studies support   this premise and perhaps this is best evidenced by the shift in market   terminology used,   from programs such as “Weight   Watchers” in the past to “NutriSystems”, or “Nutrition   Programs” in studio and health club environments. But we still have a   long way to go in terms of changing public perception, public   motivation, and market approaches to weight loss.

When the primary   goal is to “nourish” and support the body, as we begin   to ”restrict” ourselves from things that our body does not   benefit from, we also abundantly increase the things that our body   desperately needs. These “needs” are not the same for every body, and are certainly   not comprised of “ingestibles” that help us deal or work through   the restriction, (such as zero calorie fillers like lettuce and diet soda).   Instead they might include- for you, specific fats and certain proteins   that provide tons of positive satisfaction simply because your body has desperately   needed them.  And with these plentiful additions we begin to   feel and look better, and don’t feel as restricted.

As we begin   understand the way in which our unique body uses food for fuel, and we give   it what it needs, we are naturally able to achieve our ideal   weight….reducing not just fat as required, but   also inflammation - your body’s response to stuff it   doesn’t digest well, and a source of weight that is not   attributable or solved by caloric restriction…

Approaching eating   in this more positive and nurturing way, we are more likely to achieve weight   loss success….feel less restricted and tap into more   energy!   Energy that will in turn fuel our workouts and improve   the overall quality of our lives!

Nutrition at Brookhaven Fitness Studio:   Fuel your workouts and a healthy energetic lifestyle!  View details of our programs at http://brookhavenfitness.com/nutrition/

Rachel Moncayo

Brookhaven Fitness Studio